By G9ija

FIFA has repeatedly put forward plans to change the World Cup format and Gianni Infantino has now outlined his thoughts on the Euros.

FIFA president Gianni Infantino has suggested the European Championship would follow suit and become a biennial event should the proposed World Cup plans succeed.

Led by chief of global football development Arsene Wenger, FIFA has been promoting the idea for the World Cup to shift format and take place every two years – an idea strongly opposed by both UEFA and CONMEBOL.

FIFA claimed to its member associations at their global summit in December that the alterations would make football $4.4billion richer over the initial four-year cycle.

Infantino, faced with strong opposition in Europe and South America, has now added further fuel to the fire by suggesting the Euros would happen more often if the biennial World Cup plans come to fruition.

Asked by Italian outlet ‘Radio Anch’io’ what would happen to European football’s premier international tournament in the wake of the World Cup proposals, Infantino responded: “The Euros would also take place every two years.

“In Europe, there is resistance because there is a World Cup every week with the leagues and the best players in the world, but that isn’t the case for the rest of the world: It’s a month a year, and we need to find a way to truly include the whole world in football.”

Last month, UEFA published a contrasting independent survey that called the suggested changes “alarming” just hours before FIFA released a study that reported there is a “majority” in favour of a World Cup every two years.

Infantino again claimed that FIFA’s prior findings suggested the change would be both feasible and accepted.

He added: “The presumptions are clear: 88 per cent of countries, including the majority of those in Europe, have asked for the study and the study tells us that from a sporting point of view, a World Cup every two years would work.

“There would be fewer international matches but with a greater impact.”

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) is also part of a growing list of opposition, which includes Kylian Mbappe and Robert Lewandowski, fearing the impact of the changes on the world’s sporting calendar.