By G9ija

Tesla just smashed the Guinness World Record for towing.

Elon Musk‘s electric car company shared a video on Tuesday of a Tesla Model X P100D towing a Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner at Melbourne Airport in Australia.

The minute-long video shows the electric SUV dragging the 287,000lb aircraft about 1,000 feet down the taxiway.

That was enough to smash the Guinness World Record for heaviest tow by electric production passenger vehicle.

The Dreamliner, which can weigh up to 560,000lbs with fuel, is more than triple the Model X’s recommended tow limit of about 5,500 lbs, according to Australian airline Qantas, which supplied the Dreamliner.

Qantas seems to have commissioned the video as part of a publicity stunt to show off its relationship with the carmaker.

A Tesla Model S went head-to-head in a race with one of Qantas’ Boeing 737-800 airplanes in 2016.

The airline also uses Tesla wall chargers at four airports in Australia.

Qantas said the latest stunt was part of a move to highlight its sustainability efforts, adding that it uses electric aircraft tugs at airports in Sydney and Canberra to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

However, Qantas has been feeling the heat after the International Council on Clean Transportation highlighted its poor emissions record, finding that it pollutes more than any other transpacific airline.

Elon Musk's electric car company shared a video on Tuesday of a Tesla Model X P100D towing a Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner at Melbourne Airport in Australia

Elon Musk’s electric car company shared a video on Tuesday of a Tesla Model X P100D towing a Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner at Melbourne Airport in Australia

The Dreamliner is more than triple the Model X's (pictured) recommended tow limit of about 5,500 lbs, according to Australian airline Qantas, which supplied the Dreamliner

The Dreamliner is more than triple the Model X’s (pictured) recommended tow limit of about 5,500 lbs, according to Australian airline Qantas, which supplied the Dreamliner

The Model X is known for its impressive torque and has been put to the test before.

Earlier this year, Tesla released a video of the SUV hauling rail cars carrying 125 tons of debris.

Adding another layer to the stunt, Musk said the debris was generated by his tunneling firm, the Boring Company.

Specifically, it was dug out by the Boring Company’s robot, Godot.

Musk is clearly fond of conducting stunts with Teslas, Boring Company-branded flamethrowers and pledging to create an ‘intergalactic media empire’.

The minute-long video shows the electric SUV dragging the 287,000lb aircraft about 1,000 feet down the taxiway. Pictured is a view from the backseat of the Tesla SUV

The minute-long video shows the electric SUV dragging the 287,000lb aircraft about 1,000 feet down the taxiway. Pictured is a view from the backseat of the Tesla SUV

In perhaps one of the best stunts so far, the billionaire tech mogul sent his cherry red Tesla Roadster into space as the payload of SpaceX’s history-making Falcon Heavy megarocket.

Sitting in the passenger seat of his Roadster was a dummy astronaut aptly named ‘Starman’.

The billionaire shared a final photo on Wednesday, February 7, of the Roadster that he launched into space just a day earlier.

Musk’s photo showed the car in an elliptical orbit around the sun with an increasingly distant crescent Earth in the background.

‘Last pic of Starman in Roadster enroute [sic] to Mars orbit and then the Asteroid Belt,’ he wrote on Instagram.

Out-of-this-world view of Starman riding through space in a Telsa

WHAT WILL HAPPEN TO ELON MUSK’S STARMAN AND HIS TESLA ROADSTER NOW THEY ARE IN SPACE?

Where is the roadster going?

Starman was meant to be on a 250-million-mile (400m km) journey to Mars’ orbit, propelled by the main module, which separated from Falcon Heavy shortly after launch.

But in a slight hiccup, Elon Musk admitted SpaceX overshot Falcon Heavy’s third booster burn, sending Starman further into the solar system than was originally planned.

The new orbit will sent the Roadster on a journey into the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter.

What will happen to it?

The main force that will tear the car apart over hundreds of millions of years in space is radiation.

This will particularly affect the plastics and carbon-fibre frame.

‘[Those materials] are made up largely of carbon-carbon bonds and carbon-hydrogen bonds,’ Dr William Carroll, a chemist at Indiana University told Live Science.

On Earth we are protected by a powerful magnetic field and atmosphere that shields us from the worst of radiation from the sun and cosmic rays.

Radiation in space causes those bonds to break which will eventually cause the car to fall to pieces.

‘When you cut something with a knife, in the end, you’re cutting some chemical bonds,’ Dr Carroll said.

‘All of the organics will be subjected to degradation by the various kinds of radiation that you will run into there,’ he said.

How long will it last? 

‘Those organics, in that environment, I wouldn’t give them a year,’ Dr Carroll said.

The well-secured inorganic materials, such as the aluminium frame and internal metals, would last longer, meaning it could still be recognisable in at least a million years.

However, it is unlikely it will avoid all collisions with micrometeorites and other space junk in the meantime.

Before the launch Musk said there was a chance the car might hit Mars. Now on its new path it’s not clear whether the car might run into some other space object.

 

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